Winegrowers Supplies  -  Flash Pasteurisers - for bottling juice, sweet cider or wine etc

These are 'flash pasteurisers' - a short time at high temperature - far superior to 'in bottle' pasteurisers as the flavour is not 'cooked'.

The minimum pasteurising temperature necessary depends on the length of time the apple juice will be held at the temperature. The acidity of the juice and the amount and types of yeast and bacteria present in the juice are other important factors.

When pasteurising apple juice 'in bottle' in a water bath, it is said that the minimum is 72 C for 20 minutes; the water and bottles being at that temperature. That's a long time to wait.

A flash pasteuriser is normally run at 80 C (to 82 C) for apple juice, it is only at that temperature for a few seconds, although the juice is heated progressively for a short time before that, while it travels through the pipe-in-pipe heating coil, also it remains at a high temperature afterwards as it cools down.

To be certain that the pasteurised juice is sterile, a microbiological analysis can be carried out on test samples. Tasting comparisons can also be carried out.

Below are details and prices for the pasteurisers that I sell, with 'boilers/heaters' of different power:-

All of these have pipe-in-pipe (coaxial tube) heat exchangers, I don't sell models with Plate heat exchangers as they are very difficult to clean inside after use, and cleaning is extremely important.

The THA-100 (typically 180 litres/hour) has an electric boiler of 18 kWatt power (3-phase, 380 volt). That's about as high as is practical with electricity. It doesn't matter how many filling heads are fitted, the throughput is limited by the 18 kWatt power.
 4188 Euros
Three filling heads are worthwhile if a pre-heater is to be added, which will increase the throughput.

The Propane-250 (250 to 300 litres/hour) has a Propane Gas boiler of 24 kWatt.
 4595 Euros, or with option of fully automatic temperature control 1675 Euros extra.

The Propane-450 (450 litres/hour) has a Propane Gas boiler of 42.5 kWatt.
 6150 Euros, or with option of fully automatic temperature control 1675 Euros extra.

The Diesel-350 (300 to 350 litres/hour) has a Diesel (red diesel or heating oil) boiler of 34.8 kWatt.
 5395 Euros, or with option of fully automatic temperature control 2075 Euros extra.

The Diesel-450 (400 to 450 litres/hour) has a Diesel (red diesel or heating oil) boiler of 44.3 kWatt.
 6095 Euros, or with option of fully automatic temperature control 2075 Euros extra.

and the following fully automatic models:-

The Niko PK 350/500 RWT (350 to 550 litres/hour) has a Diesel boiler of 30 to 40 kWatt.
 12,732 Euros

The Voran PA 500 (500 litres/hour) has a Propane gas boiler of 46 kWatt.
 14,900 Euros

The Voran PA 600 (600 litres/hour) has a Diesel boiler of 55 kWatt.
 14,450 Euros

The Niko PK 700/850 RWT (700 to 800 litres/hour) has a Diesel boiler of 50 to 63 kWatt.
 14,320 Euros

The Voran PA 750 (750 litres/hour) has a Propane gas boiler of 70 kWatt.
 17,950 Euros

The Niko PK 1100 RWT (850 to 1100 litres/hour) has a Diesel boiler of 80 kWatt.
 17,375 Euros

The Voran PA 1000 (1000 litres/hour) has a Diesel boiler of 91 kWatt.
 19,950 Euros

The Voran PA 1500 (1500 litres/hour) has a Propane gas boiler of 140 kWatt.
 24,800 Euros

The throughput depends on the temperature of the juice entering the pasteuriser; the lower the initial temperature of the juice the longer it will take to heat up. The higher the power the faster the juice is heated, so the higher the maximum throughput.

For anyone without a 3-phase electricity supply, the propane and diesel models are ideal.
The propane gas models are a little more difficult to install than the diesel models, as you need to buy propane gas cylinders and high pressure (10 bar) propane gas tubes to connect them to the regulator on the pasteuriser.

All the propane and diesel models should be connected to a separate bottle filler or Bag-in-box filler with a small buffer tank; the bottle filler header tank acts as a buffer tank. This enables the pasteuriser to be run at a constant flow and have a stable temperature.
A small pump is needed to pump juice into the pasteuriser, it then flows through and on into the header/buffer tank.

Italian models: Propane-250, Propane-450, Diesel-350 and Diesel-450

With manual regulation of the juice temperature, by adjusting the ball-valve on the juice outlet.

or with new temperature control option from June 2016: fully automatic temperature control: start the burner, start the pump for a moment to fill the pasteuriser with juice, then switch to the automatic mode.

There is an accurate digital thermometer, and a ball-valve to control juice flow, on the outlet of the pasteuriser; once the ball-valve is adjusted to give the required temperature (80 to 82 C for apple juice is suggested by the manufacturer) it normally does not need any adjustment for hours.

These pasteurisers have an 'audible digital thermometer' on the juice outlet:-
 

Maximum and minimum temperatures need to be set initially.
It works with the existing manual ball-valve regulation, but sounds a 'Peeep' if the juice temperature goes outside the set range, thus enabling the pasteurising temperature to be monitored without having to watch the digital thermometer.

For example, set the minimum temperature at 80 C and maximum at 83 C, within the range it is silent but outside the range the warning 'Peeep' is heard.

This is available separately, to install on earlier models, 90 Euros.

The coils of the spiral stainless steel pipe (a tube within tube heat exchanger, with juice flowing in one direction and hot water in the other) are now closer together, so the coil unit is lower in height; total height is 140 cm or 160 cm with automatic temperature control.

The temperature difference between the juice and heating water is less than 2C, so the juice cannot be over heated. The boilers have automatic temperature regulation.

Electricity requirement: 220 volt, 105 Watts for manual control, or 200 Watts for automatic temperature control.

The frame stands on 4 height-adjustable legs, so it's easy to clean underneath, without moving it. It can be moved around easily with a small pallet truck.

There is 1 metre of steam hose fitted on the water inlet.
The pasteuriser can be placed close to a wall and a juice pump can be placed at the front.

Propane-250, manual control: 4595 Euros (without juice pump):-

 or fully automatic control: 

with option of fully automatic temperature control, including juice pump, 1675 Euros extra.

250 to 300 litres/hour, has a Propane gas boiler of 24 kWatt. Frame is 120 cm x 80 cm.

The 'tube in tube' heat exchanger (1.3 square metres contact area) has male threads and hose-tails.


Propane-450, manual control: 6150 Euros
(without juice pump):-

with option of fully automatic temperature control, including juice pump, 1675 Euros extra.

450 litres/hour, has a Propane gas boiler of 42.5 kWatt. Frame is 120 cm x 100 cm.

The 'tube in tube' heat exchanger (2.4 square metres contact area) has male threads and hose-tails.


Option: juice pump stainless steel, DIN 25 with juice connection, 220 volt 250 Watts, 234 Euros.

Connection hose from juice outlet to a filler, 2 metres long, high temperature (up 90C), with DIN fittings, 95 Euros.

An 'air intake' / 'exhaust flue' are needed:-

The propane gas boiler has a vertical flue outlet; suitable twin-wall stainless steel flue pipes (125 mm external diameter, 112 mm internal diameter) can be supplied on request:-

A sealed 'balanced flue' (pipe within pipe) exhaust system is needed; the air required for combustion is drawn in through the space between the walls, so no oxygen is consumed from inside the building. The flue must go out through a wall, so the exhaust gases pass outside. This is the same as a normal house central heating system.
For the propane gas boiler, if the pasteuriser is against an external wall:-
Flue Kit A type 12: a 90 degree bend and 1 metre horizontal, 146 Euros
or 1 metre vertical then a 90 degree bend and 1 metre horizontal, altogether 266 Euros.


For the Propane-250 the gas consumption is about 1.0 kilo per hour.
For the Propane-450 the gas consumption is about 1.8 kilo per hour.

Two propane gas cylinders are needed, both cylinders must be connected, the extra flow avoids the possibility of the gas 'freezing' in the regulator.

In the UK, Orange Calor propane-gas cylinders of 47 kilos are the best choice; a refill costs about 60, so the cost of running the IMF-250 is about 1.16 per hour to pasteurise 300 litres/hour. It is much cheaper to run than an 18 kWatt electrically heated model; which is 2.05 per hour with electricity costing 11.4p per kWatt hour to pasteurise only 180 litres/hour.

Already attached to the pasteuriser are two 30 milliBar pressure regulators, with a Y-connector afterwards, so you simply connect two high-pressure gas tubes (special tubes that take up to 10 Bar pressure) one from each cylinder to a regulator.
The heater is set for the modern European standard for propane-gas of 30 mBar pressure, so it's essential to use 30 mBar propane-gas regulators NOT 37 mbar.

Diesel-350 and Diesel-450:-

1250 mm high, built on a steel 100 cm x 120 cm frame, can be moved around easily with a small pallet truck.

The diesel pasteurisers have a hose which sucks in the diesel (heating oil or red diesel) which can be dipped into a 5 litre portable canister. A diesel filter is installed in the pasteuriser:-

  or fully automatic control:

Diesel-350:  5395 Euros (without juice pump):

with option of fully automatic temperature control, including MAG 11 rubber-impeller juice pump, 2075 Euros extra.

300 to 350 litres/hour, at 80 C, 34.8 kWatt boiler (29,900 kcal/hour).

Diesel consumption about 3.5 kilos/hour. 220 volts, 375 Watt.


or Diesel-450:  6095 Euros
(without juice pump):

with option of fully automatic temperature control, including rubber-impeller juice pump,2075 Euros extra.

400 to 450 litres/hour, at 80 C, 44.3 kWatt boiler (38,098 kcal/hour).

With a bigger 'tube in tube' heat exchanger than the Diesel-350; 2.4 square metres compared with 1.7 square metres.
Diesel consumption is about 4.5 Kg/hour.


The diesel boiler has a horizontal flue outlet: a single-wall flue is required, a balanced flue is not possible as the flue is at the back of the boiler and the air is sucked in at the front side under the cover directly to the burner.
stainless steel single-wall flue, 120 mm diameter, 1 metre lengths, 65 Euros each,
to take the flue upwards through a roof, a 90 degree bend can be direct from the pasteuriser; this must be made of two stainless steel 45 degree bends @ 58 Euros each = 116 Euros.

Option: juice pump stainless steel, DIN 25 with juice connection, 220 volt 250 Watts, 234 Euros.

Connection hose from juice outlet to a filler, 2 metres long, high temperature (up 90C), with DIN fittings, 95 Euros.

There is space on the frame to fit the pump and hose to feed juice to the coil-pipe. Experience has shown that the ball-valve on the outlet of the pasteuriser is good enough to control the juice flow by the pump, without a separate by-pass being needed.

Very thick liquids can be pumped in with a rubber-impeller pump.

Photo of a D-350 connected via a small buffer tank to a Bip-up semi-automatic Bag-in-box filler.

The buffer tank is needed so that the pasteuriser can run constantly.

Buffer tank and connections, 450 Euros

For bottle and Bib filling manually: the following special bottle filler can be connected to the pasteuriser. It is placed on a bench/table of suitable height when being used.

At a later time if you upgrade to a semi-automatic Bib filler, you can use the bottle filler (with 70 litre header tank) as a buffer tank, connecting the Bib filling outlet of the bottle filler to the inlet of the semi-automatic Bib filler.

This photo shows a Bag-in-box outlet on the bottle filler, with a valve to start/stop the flow.

with 4 nozzles (up to 480 litres/hr), 1319 Euros
or
with 6 nozzles (up to 720 litres/hr), 1819 Euros
or
with 8 nozzles (up to 960 litres/hr), 2110 Euros

connected to the pasteuriser, via a short length of high temperature hose to feed the juice to the header tank inlet:-

food grade hose, rated for temperature up to 160 C, 6 mm wall thickness:-
20 mm internal diameter, 18 Euros per metre,
25 mm internal diameter, 24 Euros per metre.

The bag-in-box is placed (with the tap at the top) on a set of accurate weighing scales, the fill-weight corresponding to the volume (3, 5, 10 or 20 litres) having first been calculated according to the specific gravity of the liquid at 20 C.

When feeding juice to a separate bottle filler, the juice will cool down slightly while in the bottle filler. Once the header tank and filling tubes have themselves been pasteurised by the hot juice, then they will be sterile. So when starting it is important to return the first 20 litres of juice from the bottle filler nozzles, back to the main tank, to be pasteurised again.

I always assumed that insulating the header tank would be beneficial but in practice it seems not to matter. The pasteurised juice does not cool down much in the header tank, and once the header tank and bottle filling tubes have been sterilised by the flow of hot juice, it is safe for the juice to be filled into bottles or Bibs.

Pasteuriser cleaning/sterilising:-

Halag '405', sodium hydroxide, 1 kilo (about a litre), 7 Euros
     dilute to 2% solution for use, wear rubber gloves when using it.

or Calgonit R: alkali, blue, 28 kilos, 59 Euros
   and Calgonit SP: acid, red, 30 kilos, 85 Euros
These large canisters have to be delivered on a pallet.

Hose cleaning orange rubber balls, 'mice', pushed through the tube with water from a pump or tap,
     use 3 together: 25 mm (or softer rubber 28 mm) for 20 mm id tube: 6 Euros for three

Advice:-

Filling into cold bottles increases the risk of glass breakage, so warming the bottles to 40 C or more is advantageous.
As long as the bottles (or plastic containers) are clean inside it is not necessary to sterilise them with wine sulphur before use, since the pasteurisation will achieve this.

Screw caps or crown caps are normally used, since corks are 'sucked' into bottles by about 10 mm as the contents cool. Bottles should be capped immediately after filling, and then laid on their side so that the cap is also pasteurised.
The fill height of the bottles must be adjusted, so that the correct fill level is achieved after the contents have cooled to 20 C; a trial run will be needed to ascertain this.

While in operation parts of the machine become very hot and would cause skin burns. Protective insulated gloves must be worn, so that hot bottles can be handled; i.e. removed from the filler to the capper, and then laid down. The gloves should be thick enough so that no liquid can penetrate them if a bottle with hot juice were to break. Rubber outer gauntlets and Kevlar inner gloves are ideal; available from www.toolstation.com or Screwfix etc.
Suitable shoes must also be worn, not Wellingtons where it would be possible for hot juice to run down inside. Protective glasses and clothing should also be worn.

Note: In very cold weather in Winter, when the pasteuriser is not in use, and there is a risk of the water in the boiler freezing, it is best to drain the water and refill before use next time. The manufacturer advises against adding glycol-antifreeze solution, as "it's difficult for the circulation pump to pump around".

Electrically heated pasteurisers:-

German made THA-100 (also sold by Voran as PA-180E):-

                    operating instructions


All models have dry running protection for the heater, which is normally 3-phase 380 volt.
They are 440 mm in diameter and 1580 mm high. Weight is approx 43 kilos.

A long spiral stainless steel tube runs through a water bath (initially set at 92 C, but adjustable if required), juice flowing through the tube gradually (in a few minutes) heats up to the required temperature.
There is an accurate digital thermometer at the filling head. A flow-control valve is used to regulate the temperature, which is normally 82 C for cider or apple juice, 85 to 87 C for grape juice or sweet wines.
The filling speed depends on the temperature of the juice as it enters; the colder it is the longer it takes to heat it up to 82+ C.

 9 kWatt heater, one filling head, up to about 90 litres per hour, 3278 Euros + 200 Euros delivery
             
a special 220/230 volt single-phase model can be produced for 190 Euros extra.

18 kWatt heater, two filling heads, up to about 180 litres per hour, 3988 Euros + 200 Euros delivery

18 kWatt heater, three filling heads, up to about 180 litres per hour, 4248 Euros + 200 Euros delivery

For 695 Euros extra there is an option of a pre-heating unit (stainless steel heat exchanger) that fits inside the juice tank. When supplied with hot water from a suitable source, this can raise the juice temperature to 50 - 60 C, and hence increase the output by up to 150 litres per hour.  The best hot water source for this is a 24 kWatt Propane-gas water heater; these are widely available and relatively cheap, any local plumber can install one, normally on an external wall with a flue through.

Another option is a Bag-in-Box filling attachment, platform, feed-valve, bag holder, digital thermometer, 798 Euros:-

              

25 mm hose-cleaning balls, which must be run through the juice tube at the end of each session, 6 Euros for 3.

Voran PA-90: a very small pasteuriser, 380 Volt 3-phase,  1030

The PA-90 is much too expensive for the small thoughout it can achieve.


Prices shown are exclusive of Vat.
Delivery usually will need to be charged at cost.

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